Saturday, July 15, 2017

One postmark, or two?

A couple of envelopes arrived from Eva a few Fridays ago. Bright clown feet bouncing through the letter box. Clerks usually cancel the stamps by hand in Morocco. Did they add the stamps to this one in this unusual way? Eva would surely not have placed them like this. Fortunately it didn't matter. Given the date of the postmark, this envelope took a month to reach me.



However, on the colorful envelope posted a few weeks later, the stamps were canceled with a single postmark, no bonus one this time. I wonder if the clerk respected the image on this envelope? Just another mail mystery, I guess.



Key to sating your hunger pangs at the central market in Rome is this fun guide to the food on offer. Love the fact that one part is an A-Z story and another is a found poem. 



M is for Memory is the title of this photograph that Eva sent to congratulate me on finishing the A-Z challenge. Not sure I saw the connection to memory from the photo at first. Of course after some contemplation I can see seeds 'remembering' how to grow into full plants. Perhaps the image is intended to evoke a memory. Quite likely one of a half-forgotten summer picnic. Refreshing watermelon eaten on a hot afternoon. Scrambling to evacuate after the ants also realize how delicious the fruit is. Tired after spending hours in the sun. Unhappy to be returning to reality. Vexed at having to unpack the car in the heat, which now seems sweltering instead of relaxing.

What things in the letter's contents have I not mentioned so far? X is a letter Italian's don't have to worry about starting sentences with, Eva points out. Yet another postcard from Rome showing the 17th century work titled Prospettiva you can see in the Galleria Spada.



Zebra-striped washi tape puts the final seal on Eva's envelope, as well as this post.



7 comments:

  1. If I'm not wrong, the postal rule, when stamps are cancelled by hand, is that there should be two postmarks: one on the stamps and one one the envelope. This is to make sure the postmark can be read as it can sometimes be used as a proof of date. The postmark on the stamp is usually hard to read this is why a second one is needed. I guess that one the second envelope there was no real place to ensure the postmark would be clear so the clerk gave up...

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    1. That's interesting, I'd never heard that before, and postal workers in the US do not add an extra one when hand cancelling stamps.

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  2. Eric a raison ,lors l'on oblitère les timbres manuellement c'est à dire à l'aide d'un timbre à date ,le tampon sur les timbres est pour l'oblitération et l'autre sur l'enveloppe est pour la lecture de la date .J'adore la tranche de pastèque et les pépins qui se sauvent !

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    1. It's a fascinating photo, isn't it?

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  3. Thanks for posting these. You were right: It wasn't me who stuck the stamps that way! Usually, when you go to the counter in the post officce, the postals clerks put the stamps... in creative ways, as you can see :)

    I sent a letter to you from Spain today. And, first time in history, the postal worker (the headmaster of the post office!) asked me if I prefer "nice stamps", and she stuck them on the envelope. Then, she commented: "I waste a lot of time if I do this, you know..."

    About cancellations, I didn't know the rule that Eric and Fafa explained, but it makes sense. However, I'm not sure they follow any rule in the Moroccan post offices :DD

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    1. On the envelope with red shoes, I put the stamps myself.

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    2. That was very nice of the postmaster. That would never happen here. They'd probably just print a boring label.

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